Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Plan for Condominium Postponed, Again Study Set for Terrain, Elevation of Site, Effect on Neighboring Homes

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Plan for Condominium Postponed, Again Study Set for Terrain, Elevation of Site, Effect on Neighboring Homes

Article excerpt

For the second time, the University City Council has postponed a plan to build a condominium complex at 501-515 North and South Road. Council members want to allow the developer to submit a revised site plan.

The council wants to study the terrain and elevation of the site to determine the effect that building two three-story buildings would have on adjacent single-family houses.

Several council members said at the recent council meeting that despite revised drawings from the Manlin Co. to reduce the height of the buildings by 14 feet on the west side, the complex as proposed still would be too tall and too dense for the property. The developer is scheduled to submit a revised site plan Oct. 13. The current plan proposes the construction of two apartment buildings to be called Carlton Manor with 18 units that will be sold as condominiums. Each unit would cost between $240,000 and $288,000, and the buildings would contain third-floor loft units of about 900 square feet. Municipal officials say the site plan complies with University City's comprehensive plan and with ordinances governing the property. But council members and residents expressed concerns about building what they consider to be a tall, densely populated complex in a mostly single -family-residential area. Last month, the council postponed a site plan to allow the Manlin Co. to revise its drawings to include several conditions. New drawings were presented at the recent meeting to address many of the conditions established by the council. Developer Mark Manlin said the new plan showed a lowering of the roof line by 14 feet by facing the gable into the courtyard area instead of the west side of the building. The revised plan also added brick to all sides of the building, which would cover the entire side of the structure except for around doors, windows and eaves. Despite requests from the council to increase the size of the rear yard to 25 feet from the 20 feet proposed, Manlin said the new drawing kept the yard at 20 feet because it met ordinances and because a 25-foot yard would force the buildings and their units to become significantly smaller. "To increase the rear transitional yard, the buildings have got to shrink," Manlin said. …

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