Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

`Softly, Softly' Tactic at Strangeways Siege Savage Riot in Victorian Prison Prompts Questions on Penal Reform - a Letter from London

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

`Softly, Softly' Tactic at Strangeways Siege Savage Riot in Victorian Prison Prompts Questions on Penal Reform - a Letter from London

Article excerpt

THE ending of the longest jail siege in British history on April 25 has helped to launch a reappraisal of the nation's penal policy.

By the time the last five prisoners holding out at Manchester's Strangeways prison agreed to leave, a senior judge had already opened an investigation to find out why a savage riot erupted there nearly a month earlier.

In the wake of the surrender, a dispute has arisen over why the siege was allowed to drag on for so long. This, in turn, sparked a wave of "copycat" protests in 19 other British prisons. The debate promises to be long and angry. What to David Mellor, minister in charge of prisons, had been a sustained display of "superb professionalism" by prison officers, was condemned by an opposition spokesman as a "sad and sorry episode" that the government had handled "disgracefully."

Immediate steps ordered by David Waddington, the home secretary, include the introduction of a new criminal offense of prison mutiny, carrying a 10-year sentence, and the purchase of large amounts of riot gear to curb jail disturbances in future. At a deeper level, the authorities have to find ways of easing overcrowding in British jails and reducing a prison population which at 47,000 is Europe's largest.

One effect of the Strangeways siege has been to worsen overcrowding elsewhere, as the 1,650 men who were in the building when rioting began are moved. In several prisons, three inmates are being crammed into cells designed to hold one person.

One thing is certain: Strangeways itself will not be put back into commission for several years. As the siege continued, its steadily dwindling band of inmates systematically wrecked the huge and sprawling Victorian edifice.

As the siege dragged on, the proceedings were watched nightly by millions of television viewers who came to know the prisoners by name as they cavorted on the Strangeways roof. "Strangeways Siege" T-shirts and other souvenirs went on sale in the second week. …

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