Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

DOING THE MIDAIR SAMBA This Two-Part Story Recalls the Era of Serialized Fiction in Publications Such as the `Atlantic Monthly' and `Harper's Weekly.' It Concludes in Tomorrow's Edition. the Author Is the Feature Editor of the Monitor. Series: DOING THE MIDAIR SAMBA. Part 1 of a 2-Part Series

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

DOING THE MIDAIR SAMBA This Two-Part Story Recalls the Era of Serialized Fiction in Publications Such as the `Atlantic Monthly' and `Harper's Weekly.' It Concludes in Tomorrow's Edition. the Author Is the Feature Editor of the Monitor. Series: DOING THE MIDAIR SAMBA. Part 1 of a 2-Part Series

Article excerpt

FOR several hours Beamer sliced through the mountains, gearing down to control the descent of the big truck, windows open to gulp spring air, samba music from Luty Boo and the Rio Spoon Flyers playing at maximum volume.

Behind him were thick ranges of white capped mountains fading to green; ahead was the long, gray asphalt lane pulling him home to Denver, down through the Rockies. In the truck was an unidentified load, not at all bulky or leaden, but a mystery to Beamer, except for the smell which was astringent, or was it fruity? or was it medicinal? He wasn't sure.

"Don't ask no questions," said the tall boss with the broken nose. He jabbed Beamer with an index finger on the shoulder in Kansas, face to face. "You want the load, you got it for double pay, but no questions. OK?"

Beamer drove the load out of Kansas, figuring the tall boss had yet to break the trust of two men dependent on each other as surely as pollen needs a bee. He wouldn't break trust now. OK, double pay.

He took the money, swung up into the cab like a panther, slipped in a tape of Luty Boo, samba's reigning queen, and headed for Big D, as in Denver. He loved trucks, roads, nights, the play of getting from here to there in rain or moonlight.

Now, a day later, riding the swift descent down a two-lane mountain road after driving all night and morning, things were getting a little too swift for Beamer as the truck was equal to the beat of the samba, lurching and swaying, not out of control yet, but the risk level was rising like heat from a beach in Rio.

Beamer, never a man to fold in a crisis, talked calmly to the thin air flowing through the cab around him while his left shoulder moved in a samba beat. "Rio ... here's to Rio ... oh yes, to Rio ...."

He geared down, pumping the clutch, once, twice, three times, wrestling the gearshift, his right arm fighting gravity and all known laws of physics, not to mention the sheer artistry of keeping all 18 wheels on the pavement. What ran through his mind was not danger and death, but the truck as an object on a very natural mission, a large silver bird, if you will, ready to soar easily between and around the green gabled mountains of a fabulous land.

"... Rio ... Oh yes, to Rio."

His poignant mother used to cup her hand under his little chin and tell him, "Dear boy, think before you think or you'll bump into hard things all your life." Mothers are always right. Beamer, she knew, was a bumper.

Now he saw his sweat-beaded face in the sideview mirror, big eyed but confident, a little flagrant smile, a sort of Humphrey Bogart curl to the edges of his lips as the samba beat became the soundtrack to Beamer Drives a Mystery Truck. "Mother," he whispered, "look at me now. A little help, please."

Why is it, he thought, that the road is steepening? This is flawed road engineering, he thought, better suited to a toboggan. …

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