Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Two-Plus-Four Talks Settle Polish Border Question

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Two-Plus-Four Talks Settle Polish Border Question

Article excerpt

A BUILDING spirit of understanding and cooperation on European issues - its effect on events so swift even senior officials are taken by surprise - has removed the last obstacles to a united Germany by year's end.

Foreign ministers from the two Germanys, the four victorious World War II powers, and Poland, announced July 17 that the issue of Poland's border with Germany had been resolved to the satisfaction of all parties.

This settlement, following the July 16 announcement by Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev that he was dropping his opposition to a united Germany's right to join NATO, paves the way for presentation of a draft treaty on the external aspects of German unification at the next two-plus-four talks in Moscow Sept. 12.

Signing of the treaty, probably at the November meeting in Paris of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe. This will permit a single Germany to attain full sovereignty over the former two Germanys, plus Berlin, after all-German elections Dec. 2 - just over a year after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Participants in the two-plus-four talks are the two Germanys plus the four victorious World War II powers: the United States, the Soviet Union, France, and Britain. Polish Foreign Minister Krysztof Skubiszewski participated in the discussion July 17 that focused on the Polish border. The seven ministers agreed to a list of five principles that will serve as guideposts in writing the final settlement of the border issue. In addition to recognizing a reunified Germany as the current East and West Germanys plus Berlin - "no more, no less," according to US Secretary of State James Baker III - those principles include a commitment by Germany to make no territorial claims on any other former German territories and to change its Constitution to reflect that commitment.

In addition to committing their countries to signing a border treaty, West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher and Mr. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.