Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

World Series Unites Twin Cities in Revelry Quiet Minnesotans Quit Meetings, Barge in on Neighbors with Big TVs - a Letter from Minneapolis

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

World Series Unites Twin Cities in Revelry Quiet Minnesotans Quit Meetings, Barge in on Neighbors with Big TVs - a Letter from Minneapolis

Article excerpt

MINNESOTA'S Twin Cities were separated at birth.

St. Paul, the state's capital, has an "Eastern" feel to it. Summit Avenue, the city's tree-lined promenade, reflects the city's staid demeanor. Its Roman Catholic cathedral nearly dwarfs the domed capitol. And when St. Paul's blue-blooded women go to the opera, they wear wool overcoats.

Ten miles to the west, Minneapolis's skyline glisters with glassy skyscrapers. This city, with numerous Lutheran churches, has a trendy, "Western" feel to it. On the west bank of the Mississippi River, its well-heeled women attend the symphony in full-length minks.

But these dissimilar twins discovered each other this fall. As the Twin Cities baseball team, the Minnesota Twins, entered the American League playoffs against the Toronto Blue Jays, the cities became acquainted. After the Twins won and the World Series began last weekend against the Atlanta Braves, the Minnesota cities were friends. And now, with the World Series title within its grasp, the Twin Cities appear ready to "become family."

Don't think a familial rapprochement has taken place, however. Minnesotans know the siblings soon will part and go their separate ways, even before the first ice forms on Lake Calhoun. People here recall a similar, brief friendship in 1987, when the Twins won the World Series. Still, the friendship - however short-lived - is wonderful to behold.

In any given year, a love for walleye fishing and a dislike of the state's bitter winters are about all that Twin Cities largely Scandinavian and Irish populations can agree on.

People in St. Paul - many of whom have not traveled to Minneapolis during the entire year - have reportedly been spotted haggling with ticket scalpers outside the Twins stadium, the Metrodome.

A summer lottery determined the favored few who would see the series. But that hasn't deterred the rest of the residents on both sides of the Mississippi, most of whom have been glued to their televisions. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.