Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

From Reporter to Dough Boy A Monitor Writer Discovers Breadmaking by Machine

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

From Reporter to Dough Boy A Monitor Writer Discovers Breadmaking by Machine

Article excerpt

A NEW appliance that sits in the center of my stovetop has changed my life.

It has a futuristic shape like Artoo Deetoo, with buttons, lights, and beepers - but it takes me back in time.

Like Walter Mitty, the famous James Thurber character who fantasized about otherwordly adventure on cue, I travel through time with the tap of a control panel: back to Old-World Italy ... back to an Indian village on the Great Plains ... back to the cave man huddled in hunger before the first stone oven.

Don't mess with me, I'm baking bread.

OK, I'm behind the curve. Bread machines started getting hot about two years ago. But now they're the rage: "Mr. Loaf," "Breadman," "Accu-Bakery," "BreadOven" are just a handful of the proliferating names by such companies as DAK, Welbilt, Zojirishi, and Trillium. Panasonic was first into the market, followed by Zojirishi. Both lead the market, both are Japanese.

The machines are getting more and better features.

There are special settings for wheat, oat, white, french, and egg breads. There are stronger motors and rotor-kneaders that can handle denser, multigrain breads - even fruit and nuts.

There are timers for overnight baking, and special "turbo" settings that cut about 90 minutes off baking time (by maximizing heat and humidity for faster, more- controlled rising). And there is also a burgeoning sub-industry of cookbooks with hundreds of recipes from spaghetti and cola bread to chocolate chip and mint bread. Not to mention special gourmet yeasts, ceramic baking stones, and professional-sized wooden spatulas designed to scoop your steaming loaf from the oven with a satisfying swish. (With most machines, you can take the dough out after the kneading cycle and bake it in your own oven for a crisper crust).

The machines I've seen run from about $80 to $400 with most reasonable and decent models being between $120 and $250. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.