Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Din-O-Mite Exhibit on the Prowl Tyrannosaurus Rex and His Relations Are Doing the Museum Circuit

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Din-O-Mite Exhibit on the Prowl Tyrannosaurus Rex and His Relations Are Doing the Museum Circuit

Article excerpt

`JURASSIC Park" fans, hungry for more dino info can get a second helping at Boston's Museum of Science.

"The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park," is a lively display that helps separate fact from fiction through the use of movie props, dinosaur reconstructions, and fossils - including two of the largest dinosaur eggs ever found. Never before publicly displayed, the football-sized eggs were recently discovered in China and belong to the late Tarbosaur bataar, Asian cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex.

Riding a wave of unabashed dino-mania, the exhibit features eight life-sized dinosaur models made from casts used for the popular film. Videos of clips from the movie accompany these mighty creatures, shown amid a green, jungle-like setting. Meanwhile, viewers learn fact from fantasy through placards and interpreters.

"Some things we know were wrong {in the movie} and some things we say, `Well, maybe they were wrong or maybe they weren't.' But I think that's why people were intrigued," says Lynn Baum, Museum of Science exhibit planner. "They want to know what is the line between science and fantasy."

The difference can be greater than many realize. Take the Velociraptor. Rather than being the size of a human as shown in the film, scientific evidence suggests these reptiles were probably the size of wolves. Hollywood shows the Dilophosaurus as a poison-spitting creature with a colorful frill around its neck. Yet evidence shows that these creatures neither spit poison nor had colorful frills, though they did have a bony crest on each side of the head as the movie showed.

As for the ferocious flesh-eating Tyrannosaurus rex, the movie depicts this critter as a much faster-moving animal than it was.

"No dinosaur could keep pace with a Ford explorer," says Don Lessem, founder of the Dinosaur Society, a nonprofit research group that organized the exhibit. …

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