Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Leadership on the Team

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Leadership on the Team

Article excerpt

MILLIONS of television viewers in the Northern Hemisphere are being caught up in another season of football in its various forms--from American football, to rugby, to the world game of association football (or soccer). All, in their individual ways, are team games in which the common good is prized above individual acclaim, and strong leadership is essential. One autumn many years ago the players on a rugby team at an internationally famous university chose a versatile forward, who later became a friend of mine, to be their captain. Recalling the experience, he told me that at first he was overawed by the thought that he had been chosen to captain one of the most famous rugby clubs in England. He would be required to lead by example on and off the field. It was natural for him, as a student of Christian Science, to pray about the best way to meet the responsibilities facing him. He realized that effective leaders are also good followers, and that his first duty was to follow Christ Jesus' example and serve God. His success as team captain would rest not on personal brilliance or charisma, but on his readiness to follow God's direction. As a teenager, my friend had become accustomed to treating the Bible as his training manual. And he especially loved the Apostle Paul's assurance in his letter to the Ephesians that there is "one God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all (4:6). Now, as never before, he had an opportunity to prove the truth of Paul's insight. The Discoverer of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, illuminates the Scriptures in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. She writes, "The manifestation of God through mortals is as light passing through the window-pane. The light and the glass never mingle, but as matter, the glass is less opaque than the walls. The mortal mind through which Truth appears most vividly is that one which has lost much materiality--much error--in order to become a better transparency for Truth" (p. 295 ). When the new captain reread that passage in Science and Health, he realized that, for transparency, the windows of thought need to be squeaky clean. …
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