Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

No Matter How Harvard Does, Tailback Eion Hu Still Scores Goals Have Eluded His Team This Year, but He's Making It off the Field

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

No Matter How Harvard Does, Tailback Eion Hu Still Scores Goals Have Eluded His Team This Year, but He's Making It off the Field

Article excerpt

While many college football players are already anticipating postseason bowl games, others, like Eion Hu, are about to write the last chapters in their organized football careers.

Hu, a first-generation Chinese-American, is a stocky, 205-pound senior running back at Harvard University. Saturday will mark his last hurrah in a Harvard uniform.

The outcome is of no real importance to those beyond Harvard, but it means the world to Hu, who is the school's all-time leading rusher. Neither team is in contention for this year's Ivy League crown. Both are 1-5 in conference play and need a victory to escape the league cellar. This is not exactly the sort of futility Hu had in mind when he arrived from Ringwood, N.J., fulfilling a dream to attend what he considers America's finest university. (Both Hu's parents work at William Patterson College in Wayne, N.J., his father as a biology professor and his mother as a lab technician.) "When I came here {to Harvard} I wanted to be the starting tailback, I wanted to help the team be successful, but most of all I wanted to win the Ivy championship," Hu said while waiting for an afternoon of chalk talks and practice to start. As the seasons have gone by, though, Hu says he has had to constantly reassess his goals. "It shouldn't be done that way," he says reluctantly, "but sometimes you're forced into it." By last week, as Harvard neared the end of its sixth straight losing season, he had just two goals left: to experience victory in Harvard's last two games first against the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and then against arch rival Yale. Objective No. 1 went by the boards last weekend when Penn prevailed 17-12, leaving only this week's Yale game to assuage past disappointments. A win would do it for Hu, who was the 1994 Ivy Rookie of the Year. "When you win in football," he continues, "everybody is happy. Individual accomplishments are different. "When you get an A on a test and tell your friends it seems like bragging. But when you win in a team sport, you enjoy it with everyone and there's no better feeling of joy. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.