Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Rocks and Bottles Greet and Bid Farewell to France's Most Controversial Politicians

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Rocks and Bottles Greet and Bid Farewell to France's Most Controversial Politicians

Article excerpt

Djillali Boumezioud says he hadn't planned to spend last Friday night in a crowd flinging rocks at Bruno Megret, the leading candidate for France's most controversial party.

"I just wanted to hear what he had to say, but they wouldn't let me into the meeting. I'm against the National Front because they're against us. If they get into power, we could be separated from our families like the Jews were in World War II," he explains.

Mr. Boumezioud was born in France and is a French citizen, but his parents entered France illegally from Algeria. The National Front calls for expelling immigrants to free up jobs for unemployed French workers. "You have seen hate tonight, but it's not from the National Front," Mr. Megret told some 120 anxious supporters, who listened to his stump speech through the sounds of rocks deflecting off the back door of the hall. The National Front's security has been the most intimidating in French politics, but there were no shaved heads in the low-key security detail that used portable phones to call in police help and that urged National Front supporters to just "get back quickly" to their cars after the meeting, despite the continuing hail of stones and bottles. …

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