Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

How Orthodoxy Differs from Roman Catholicism

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

How Orthodoxy Differs from Roman Catholicism

Article excerpt

Until the Great Schism of 1054, what is now referred to as Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity were one. This single Christian church recognized three patriarchates - Rome, Antioch, and Alexandria. Later, Constantinople and Jerusalem were added.

From the 4th century until the 10th, the two groups sparred over questions about the nature of Jesus Christ.

The major split between East and West concerned the doctrine of the "filioque" - meaning "from the son." At the Council of Nicea in 902, Rome accepted into the Nicene Creed that the Spirit "proceeds from the Father and the Son." The Orthodox Church, on the other hand, accepts only that the Spirit "proceeds from the Father." The Armenian, the Coptic, and the Jacobean churches of the East split from Eastern Orthodoxy over monophystism. Those churches maintain that the nature of Jesus Christ is divine. Both Western Christianity and Orthodoxy recognize the nature of Christ as divine and human. The Orthodox Church, formally known as the Holy Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Eastern Church has no set of creeds in the modern use of the word. …

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