Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

A Way out Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

A Way out Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Article excerpt

Even the snowplow was stuck! The huge vehicle, its big bed laden with road salt and sand, was slipping and spinning in the cab-high snowbank at the side of our road.

Yet, there was no doubt the truck would be freed. Shovels, smaller trucks, a new idea, as well as a push from a front-loader, and the plow was back in service, finishing its important work.

The memory of that big stuck truck came to me later as a useful metaphor. I hadn't thought for a minute that the truck would spend the rest of the winter in the snowbank, freed only with the spring thaw. It was needed. Efforts to move it would be successful. Perhaps you might wonder about freedom from your own personal challenges. Do you sometimes feel there's no way out, that you're stuck in a circumstance forever, or at least for the foreseeable future? But where is there help amid that kind of thinking? And where is God? Is He absent, unable to help, unavailable? Certainly not! When faced with difficult situations, I've found that the quicker I remember God's power, as seen in the promise "I am the Lord that healeth thee" (Exodus 15:26), the quicker I am freed from whatever my trouble may be. If we consent to being trapped in some way, or to being beyond aid, we're actually denying God - denying His presence and power to heal. To find solutions, we need to reach out for God's care and love and trust Him. We need to know His unfailing goodness. As in the case of the snowbound plow, we need to remember that through God there will come a freeing, a restoration to normality. God bestows harmony, not discord; peace, not strife; health, not sickness. We can learn to expect God's care, feel that we are walking with Him, our hand in His, despite what circumstances we might be facing. As I write today, I'm looking out the window at the mouth of a large river, where it joins the open ocean. The tide, which was at full high when I came to my desk, is now quite low. In a few hours there will be only a thin channel where before there had been a broad basin of water. But in all the time I've lived here, the tides have never failed to flow with perfect regularity. …

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