Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Trees Bring Life, Healing to War-Torn El Salvador 'Forest of Reconciliation' Provides Hope Where Fighting Once Raged

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Trees Bring Life, Healing to War-Torn El Salvador 'Forest of Reconciliation' Provides Hope Where Fighting Once Raged

Article excerpt

Ten years ago, Francisco Acosta's childhood home on El Salvador's Guazapa Volcano was under siege. A fiery battleground for leftist rebels and government army troops embroiled in his country's long civil war, the once lush, forested mountain north of San Salvador was rapidly being stripped of life - plant, animal, and human.

Today, things are quieter on the dormant volcano. Not only has the fighting stopped, but forest life is also returning, thanks to Francisco Acosta and his wife, Barbara. Struck by the glaring need to heal both people and nature when the war ended in 1992, the couple came up with a plan: They would lead residents of Mr. Acosta's former neighborhood in planting The National Forest of Reconciliation.

Their goal, which they continue to work toward today, is to plant one tree in memory of each of more than 75,000 people who died in the 12-year war. This, the Acostas say, is a practical way to begin reclaiming some of the forest devastated by fighting, fires, and the 4,000 tons of bombs dropped on Guazapa. They also hope that planting these thousands of symbols of new life will help bring peace and healing to people from all sides of the war. "We knew we had to look at both the human and environmental aspects of the difficulties people faced {after the peace accords were signed}," says Mrs. Acosta, an American who has lived with her husband and two children near San Salvador for the past eight years. The Reconciliation Forest, she stresses, is not the ultimate solution, but a tool to "bring people through the process of anger and grief necessary for the nation to move on." It's an idea that has been endorsed by Salvadorans in dozens of communities around the Guazapa Volcano; it is also gaining international recognition. Not just plants and animals This was evident when the Acostas spoke recently at a gathering of 200 members from more than 30 countries of the Society for Human Ecology at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine. Their topic included the subject of human ecology, a field adopted by educators and professionals that includes not just plants and animals, but also people studying the environment. Mrs. Acosta, a former student of human ecology at the College of the Atlantic, says it is this holistic view that inspired the reconciliation project. Richard Borden, administrative dean at College of the Atlantic - a school which pioneered the field in the 1970s - commends the couple's efforts. "The Acostas' work is a perfect example of using the human ecology approach to deal with extremely complex problems. Their ability to think broadly and come up with the necessarily complex solutions to those problems is the key to their success." So far, Guazapa area residents have planted more than 110 acres of trees in the National Forest of Reconciliation, which is on the highest slopes of the 4,700-foot volcano. …

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