Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Entangled in S. Lebanon, Israel Debates Its 'Vietnam' Loss of 35th Soldier This Year in Combat Sept. 29 Fuels Talk of a Pullout

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Entangled in S. Lebanon, Israel Debates Its 'Vietnam' Loss of 35th Soldier This Year in Combat Sept. 29 Fuels Talk of a Pullout

Article excerpt

The image of America's lost war in Vietnam is emerging in southern Lebanon, where Israel - the strongest military power in the Middle East - is suffering critical losses at the hands of Hizbullah guerrillas trying to expel an Israeli occupying force.

The Vietnam example is never far from the debate among Israel's top brass, who are facing mounting pressure at home to withdraw but for whom the US solution - declaring victory where there is none, and going home - is not easily followed.

A defeat at the hands of an Arab force - something that has never happened in the Jewish state's 49-year history - would be wrenching. The debate now centers on how Hizbullah would respond if Israel pulls out. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warns that Hizbullah would "follow" Israeli troops into northern Israel, but sources familiar with the Islamic guerrillas counter that such action is unlikely. Recent Israeli losses, which include the killing of a soldier by a Hizbullah missile Sept. 29 and the deaths of 12 naval commandos during a botched raid deep into Lebanese territory earlier last month, seem to have caused Israel to adjust its demands. In February, 73 Israeli soldiers were killed when two military helicopters collided en route to operations in Lebanon. Even Ariel Sharon, a hawk and minister of defense during Israel's 1982 invasion, in which it incurred heavy losses, has said that the government should reassess its role in Lebanon. For years, Israel has insisted on the disarming of Hizbullah before any Israeli pullout. But now Mr. Netanyahu talks of receiving "security guarantees" from Lebanese authorities to prevent cross-border attacks. Despite near-consensus among Western diplomats that Hizbullah would show restraint in the event of an Israeli departure, a State Department official in Washington echoes the Israeli line that such a move would "leave all of northern Israel completely vulnerable" to attack. Lebanon is linked to the wider Arab-Israeli peace process. With some 30,000 troops in Lebanon, ostensibly as "peacekeepers," Syria is the main power broker facing Israel. Syria has made clear that it will scuttle any deal that leaves Syria - and Israel's return of the Golan Heights to Syria - off the agenda. 'Resistance will continue' Officially, top Hizbullah sources do not reveal how they would react if Israeli troops packed up and left. "We don't say we will stop or not stop {at the Israeli border}," says one. "We have our secrets, and the Israelis have theirs. But if they don't pull out, they are going to receive more corpses. "This resistance will continue," he says. "It is a sacred thing." But long-term observers say Hizbullah knows well the distinction between attacking occupying Israelis and launching unprovoked raids on Israel itself that would invite a severe Israeli response and undermine the current widespread support for Hizbullah within Lebanon. …

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