Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Occupation Taxes for Serving Drinks on Council Agenda

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Occupation Taxes for Serving Drinks on Council Agenda

Article excerpt

An ordinance setting up new occupation taxes for places serving alcoholic beverages, wholesalers and package stores will be before th e Oklahoma City Council today.

All places serving alcoholic beverages, whether a small restaurant or a large private club, would pay $1,000 the first year, with a renewal fee of $900 each year, if the occupation fee is passed.

In addition, each place also would have to pay the state license fee of $1,000.

Abolished would be previous ordinance, which provided for three classes of occupation taxes: $615 a year for private clubs; $315 a year for restaurants serving beer and wine, and $115 for non profit service clubs.

The taxes are separate from the "overlay" rezoning fees, which were set last week.

The ordinance to be considered today also calls for:

- A $1,000 occupation tax for bottle clubs, caterers licenses, plus airline and railroad licenses, with $900 for renewal.

- $3,500 for a wholesaler, up from $2,000.

- $625 for a class B wholesaler, up from $500. This would be reduced by 75 percent if the class B wholesaler holds a state license.

- $900 for package stores, up from $600.

- $50 for a special event license.

- $500 for service organizations which are exempt from the Internal Revenue Code for mixed beverage or bottle club license.

- $1,250 for a brewer, up from $1,000. This would be reduced by 75 percent if the brewer holds a state license.

- $3,125 for a distiller, up from $2,500.

- $625 for a winemaker, up from $500; and $75 for an Oklahoma winemaker, up from $50.

- $3,125 for a rectifier, up from $2,500.

Under a separate ordinance, retailers selling 3.2 percent beer would pay $20 a year for consumption on the premises and $10 for consumption off the premises.

The city clerk's licensing division is prepared to receive applications for about 300 licenses from businesses presently in operation, said Judy Walker, who heads the division. These will not be subject to the the new "overlay" zoning ordinance. …

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