Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Rebuff of Dog Adoption May Ease Process for Others; St. Louis County Animal Shelter Will Review Policy Requiring Multiple Visits

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Rebuff of Dog Adoption May Ease Process for Others; St. Louis County Animal Shelter Will Review Policy Requiring Multiple Visits

Article excerpt

OLIVETTE - Madonna Courtright wanted to get a buddy for her dog but instead got into a dispute with officials at St. Louis County's shelter here that in the end could make long-distance adoptions easier.

Courtright was looking for a Shih Tzu like her pet Fred, so when a friend posted a picture on Facebook of one from the county's website, Courtright clicked on it. The dog was 4, a little older than she wanted, so Courtright started to look at the other dogs on the website. That's when she saw Peaches.

"She was as cute as a button," Courtright said.

When she called St. Louis County's shelter to ask about Peaches, workers told Courtright she would have to come in to fill out an application. If she was approved, she would have to come back to pick up Peaches.

That wouldn't be very convenient for Courtright, 55, who lives in Bloomington, Ill., about a three-hour drive from the shelter.

She asked workers if they had an application she could fill out online or they could mail to her, so she could avoid making one of the trips. They told her they didn't have one online and they wouldn't mail it.

Courtright said she thought that seemed to be counter to the shelter's mission - finding good homes for pets.

"This is a kill shelter, and I knew that this little girl had been there a month already, so I felt this sense of urgency," she said.

Courtright complained to Drew Hane, who manages veterinary services in St. Louis County. Hane said the shelter required would- be owners to come in and provide paperwork about where they live so workers can verify, for instance, if a landlord would allow the pet. In addition, workers get contact information from a veterinarian to make sure that the pet will be cared for properly.

Hane said people also must come in to meet the pet and make sure they are compatible.

"We want to make sure the pets aren't going to be returned to our shelter or another one," he said.

In addition, shelter personnel feel that owners of a puppy mill or a dog-fighting operation - two things they guard against - are less likely to adopt if the process requires them to come in twice.

But neither one was a concern in Peaches' case, Courtright said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.