Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Law & Order; Public Safety

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Law & Order; Public Safety

Article excerpt

ST. LOUIS > Man shot by police is charged - Terrence Gurley, 34, of the 6000 block of Lindenwood Court, was charged Wednesday, a day after being shot by police in the 2800 block of Osage Avenue. Gurley was charged with second-degree assault on a law enforcement officer, unlawful possession of a firearm and resisting arrest. He was jailed in lieu of $50,000 cash bail. Police said Gurley was driving a dark green Cadillac Escalade about 1 p.m. Tuesday when an officer tried to stop him for allegedly running a stop sign at Chippewa Street and Nebraska Avenue. The officers followed Gurley with their squad car's lights and sirens off until Gurley stopped on Oregon Avenue at the entrance to an alley behind Osage. With an officer in pursuit, Gurley fled down the alley and between two houses. Gurley was then spotted holding a semiautomatic handgun. Police ordered him to drop the gun and shot him when he pointed the gun at the officer, police said. He was hit in the buttocks, shoulder and leg, police said. He did not have life-threatening injuries and was treated at a hospital. Police found Gurley's gun at the scene.

ST. LOUIS > Ballwin man charged in alleged auction house fraud - A Ballwin man has been arrested in connection with a Chicago-area auction house accused of routinely defrauding customers by misrepresenting the condition or authenticity of items such as Elvis Presley's hair, a 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings trophy baseball and a Honus Wagner T-206 card, the world's most expensive baseball card, federal prosecutors in Chicago said Wednesday. William Boehm, 63, appeared in federal court Wednesday, prosecutors said. Boehm was the director of information technology for the auction house, Mastro Auctions, and lied to FBI agents investigating the case, they said. Boehm faces one count of lying to federal agents for allegedly claiming that he had disabled two bidding accounts for reasons other than the truth - that the auction house had used them to place fake bids. Mastro Auctions, which specialized in sports memorabilia, lied in auction catalogs and in promotion materials for their auctions and deceived bidders by canceling sales and using shell bidding to inflate prices, prosecutors said. …

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