Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Kazakh Cowboys Learn to Handle Cattle; Ranchers from the Former Soviet Republic Visit North Dakota as They Rebuild Herd

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Kazakh Cowboys Learn to Handle Cattle; Ranchers from the Former Soviet Republic Visit North Dakota as They Rebuild Herd

Article excerpt

MANDAN, N.D. Mananbai Sadykov cuffed his stiff blue jeans over intricately stitched cowboy boots and tread mindfully though minefields of cattle manure at the Helbling Hereford Ranch in central North Dakota.

Sadykov, 48, is no citified dandy, having worked with livestock most of his life in Kazakhstan. But he tried to keep his new duds a gift from some North Dakota ranchers cowpie-free. Western wear is rare in the former Soviet republic. And, until recently, so were cows.

About 15 Kazakh cattlemen, Sadykov included, visited North Dakota ranches last month to inspect the states beef herd and get a hands- on tutorial in tending cattle from veteran cowboys.

Its not splitting atoms, growing cows. But it is hard work, said Mark Archibald, who ranches near Hettinger in southwestern North Dakota and hosted a contingent of the Kazakhs. They havent had the background to build upon, so were showing them our way of doing things.

Kazakhstans beef herd was butchered and all but sold off following the downfall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Cattle numbers dropped from about 35 million to about 2 million. To help rebuild that industry, more than 5,000 Hereford and Angus cattle bred to withstand North Dakotas notoriously nasty winters have been sent since 2010 via jumbo jets from Fargo to Kazakhstan, and a shipment of 3,000 more is planned before years end.

Sadykov has been overseeing several hundred of the relocated ruminants in Kazakhstan, whose climate and landscape are similar to North Dakotas.

Very good, very tough cows, Sadykov said through an interpreter, while eyeing dozens of hardy Herefords with their thick, hairy coats. Very good in cold.

North Dakotas cows also typically have more marbling and fatty tissue, which gives the state an advantage in cattle sales, agriculture officials said.

There are some marketing opportunities there, said Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring, Its going to take a long time for them to build up their inventory.

Dean Gorder, executive director of the North Dakota Trade Office, said the state has had a strong trade relationship with Kazakhstan and also exports farm machinery. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.