Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Making Way for the Future: Building Designs Reflect Changing Landscape of Health Care

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Making Way for the Future: Building Designs Reflect Changing Landscape of Health Care

Article excerpt

As the Tulsa Cancer Institute started work on its new headquarters, consolidating three local offices into one, Chief Executive Paul Bukofzer said the evolving health care provider decided to install demountable walls inside the 86,000-square-foot complex.

For while the structure was designed to fit today's health care needs, Bukofzer said they wanted the $46 million project to easily adapt to tomorrow's concerns.

"We can reconfigure the building easier than if it was built on a concrete slab," he told the Tuesday breakfast meeting of Tulsa's NAIOP chapter.

That marks just one example of how the commercial real estate sector is adapting to the nation's evolving health care marketplace, as Bukofzer noted in an NAIOP panel with David Huey, a principal in Dewberry's Tulsa office, and Tulsa Spine and Specialty Hospital CEO Terry Woodbeck.

Huey, whose architectural firm has worked on 6.5 million square feet of hospital space and 3.6 million square feet of outpatient clinics, noted two areas where health care operators want the same thing as office or industrial builders - environmentally friendly construction elements and operating systems.

"If we haven't designed it to at least Silver design designation or better, we haven't done our jobs," said Huey, noting a midlevel rating under the U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, accreditation.

This lends itself to designing lean, flexible structures that occupants may operate efficiently with lower staff levels, Huey said. Their designs also emphasize more public spaces, to keep facilities friendly and help encourage workers and customers to want to stay and be there.

Bukofzer echoed that, noting a series of walking trails and internal gardens at the 16-acre Tulsa Cancer Institute campus, which Flintco should complete later this year at Garnett and the Broken Arrow Expressway. …

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