Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Shakespeare Festival Sparks Post-Dispatch Tradition; Theater Critic Judith Newmark Teams with Artist John Telford to Help Explain Classic Plays

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Shakespeare Festival Sparks Post-Dispatch Tradition; Theater Critic Judith Newmark Teams with Artist John Telford to Help Explain Classic Plays

Article excerpt

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis brings classic theater to the masses each year (given St. Louis summers, often the sweaty masses).

What began in 2001 has been become a local summer staple as crowds, outfitted with coolers, wine bottles, blankets and yard chairs, descend on Forest Park to watch free Shakespeare beneath the moonlit trees.

This year "Twelfth Night" will be performed at 8 p.m. Friday through June 16 (except Tuesdays) at Shakespeare Glen near the St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. Preview nights are Wednesday and Thursday.

The free, family-friendly way to open the summer inspired a Post- Dispatch tradition. Since "A Midsummer's Night Dream" in 2002, the P- D has created a poster that breaks down the story and characters using cartoons.

For more than a decade, Post-Dispatch theater critic Judith Newmark has teamed with artist John Telford to create a special way to bring Shakespeare to novices as a well as aficionados. They began the partnership when Telford worked at the Post-Dispatch and have continued it since he founded Buzzmachine Studios.

This year's poster appears on Sunday's cover of the A&E section and will adorn a 12-foot-by-8-foot wall near the stage in Forest Park. Theatergoers can get a fun, lively description of "Twelfth Night" on the scene and explain Shakespeare to those who are less familiar with the story. The current and past posters are available at stltoday.com/shakespeare.

Newmark, who has been the Post-Dispatch theater critic since 1995, studied Shakespeare in college and has had a long love affair with Shakespearean theater. "Shakespeare, like the moon, belongs to everyone," she says.

Enter the colorful poster and its role to make Shakespeare more accessible to more people.

"I know that some people feel scared by the language, by the history, just by the writer's name," Newmark says.

"They shouldn't have to feel that way. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.