Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Oil Assn. Executive to Tulsa Press Club: By Pipe, Rail or Barge, Canadian Oil to Keep Moving South

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Oil Assn. Executive to Tulsa Press Club: By Pipe, Rail or Barge, Canadian Oil to Keep Moving South

Article excerpt

Even when he is scheduled to speak about something else, Andrew Black expects to talk about the Keystone XL pipeline.

The issue is so volatile that Black knows eventually discussion will turn to the controversial pipeline.

Black, president and CEO of the Association of Oil Pipe Lines, addressed about 35 people during a Page One Luncheon Wednesday at the Tulsa Press Club.

The debate over the 1,700-mile pipeline has moved from jobs to safety, Black said. The pipeline would transport 800,000 barrels of crude every day from Canada's oil sands to the refining complex along the Gulf Coast. Because the pipeline crosses the U.S.- Canadian border, approval must come from President Barack Obama. The president rejected TransCanada's application once and now a second application has languished on his desk. The northern portion of the project has been idle for five years.

Meanwhile, the southern leg of the TransCanada project, from Cushing to the Gulf Coast, has been under construction for months.

"Now, the debate is whether, if the Keystone XL is rejected, then Canada will simply lock it up and go home," Black said. "No. Oil from Canada will still come here, just by rail."

The silver lining in the whole Keystone debates, Black said, is what he referred to as Keystone fatigue.

"Everyone has heard so much about Keystone that the public is aware of the issues - that the pipeline would be good for the country. It will provide construction jobs, demands for professional services and more," Black said. "Keystone is not the first pipeline to bring oil south from Canada to the U.S. It is not the only project that would give the U.S. additional access to Canadian oil sands, but it is a major project that gets attention because it needs a presidential permit."

The real debate is not about whether Canada should produce crude oil or natural gas from the oil sands, Black said, because neither issue will be affected by a presidential permit or the rejection of a permit. …

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