Newspaper article The Record (Bergen County, NJ)

Man Gets 24 Years for Child Porn

Newspaper article The Record (Bergen County, NJ)

Man Gets 24 Years for Child Porn

Article excerpt

A Lodi man who argued that the punishment for viewing child pornography is draconian was sentenced on Monday to more than 24 years in prison by a federal judge who declared him a danger to society.

"This defendant poses a full-blown risk of contact offenses and an extraordinary risk of recidivism for non-contact offenses," U.S. District Judge Stanley R. Chesler said in sentencing Martin Villalobos, 41, to 292 months in federal prison.

The judge noted that investigators had discovered a bottle of chloroform in Villalobos' room along with a video of him sexually molesting his "comatose sister" and a list of rules for an abducted person to follow to survive in captivity as a sex slave.

Such evidence, the judge said, suggests that Villalobos "has limited to no ability to control his own sexual" proclivities and demonstrates the serious risk he poses.

After a weeklong trial in federal court in Newark, Villalobos was convicted in January of amassing and sharing an extensive collection of photos and videos of children being sexually abused.

Villalobos was arrested in August 2011 after agents, conducting a search of his bedroom, recovered a computer and 16 DVDs containing 5,442 photographs and 164 videos depicting minors being sexually abused.

A jury found him guilty on two counts each of distribution of child pornography and receiving child pornography, and one count of possession of child pornography.

Wearing a bright yellow jail-issued jumpsuit, Villalobos, who was acting as his own counsel, urged the judge to impose a five-year sentence. He cited various studies and a 2012 report by the U.S. Sentencing Commission that called for the easing of federal sentencing guidelines in child pornography cases.

Villalobos, who insisted he has "never improperly touched a child," argued that he was being unjustly punished for exercising his constitutional right to have a jury decide his guilt or innocence. …

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