Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

With State in the Black, It's Time to Return Some Green to People ; COMMUNITY COMMENT

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

With State in the Black, It's Time to Return Some Green to People ; COMMUNITY COMMENT

Article excerpt

Who would have thought that in an economy that has been labeled the worst since the Great Depression, the candidates for governor would be talking about tax cuts, including income tax cuts (individual or corporate) and the elimination of the sales tax on gasoline. This makes a fiscal conservative's day.

Most states are slashing budgets and drowning in red ink, but in Indiana the debate is what to do with the "extra" money. Of course, there is the chorus of voices who say instead of giving this money back to the people who earned it, we should give it to the people who like to spend it.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike Pence has proposed a 10 percent across the board cut in the individual income tax, while his opponent, Democrat John Gregg, has offered up the elimination of the state sales tax on gasoline and the elimination of corporate income taxes for businesses headquartered in Indiana.

Frankly, I am more partial to reductions and eliminations in income taxes rather than sales taxes. I would much rather that government collects my money when I consume a good or service rather than when I go out and work to earn a living.

Both Joe Donnelly and Richard Mourdock have come out in favor of extending the Bush tax cuts, much to the chagrin of the progressive movement. Opponents say the tax cuts for the top 2 percent should be allowed to expire. If I thought the government would actually use what would amount to about $80 billion for deficit reduction I would agree, but we all know what is going to happen here.

There is a valid argument to be made - and critics of tax cuts are correct - when they say more money for taxpayers is less money for government programs. My answer is: So what?

The same local governments that complained about limited resources are the same people who fought tooth and nail against Kernan-Shepard reforms which would have consolidated offices and promoted efficiencies. …

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