Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

I-69 Gets out of Tri-State [Corrected 11/28/12] ; Outgoing Governor Will Lead Inaugural Ride to Crane, Ind

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

I-69 Gets out of Tri-State [Corrected 11/28/12] ; Outgoing Governor Will Lead Inaugural Ride to Crane, Ind

Article excerpt

The first stretch of Interstate 69 will open to vehicles today, and Southern Indiana political leaders said their goal now is to milk every possible economic, safety and convenience benefit from the new highway. "It's going to be a big day. We're very excited," said Mayor Lloyd Winnecke, who will join Gov. Mitch Daniels and many others for today's ceremonies. Daniels will lead a caravan of vehicles up I-69 on his motorcycle.

The completed part of I-69 covers 67 miles and goes from Interstate 64 to Crane, Ind. It eventually will link Evansville to Indianapolis.

Area political leaders pushed for generations to make the opening happen. The involvement of Lt. Gov.-elect Sue Ellspermann of Ferdinand dates to her work with Voices for I-69 while on the Evansville Chamber of Commerce board.

Since 2006, Ellspermann has been director of the University of Southern Indiana Center for Applied Study, whose projects have included the I-69 Community Development Study.

She also remembered attending the opening of Interstate 64 in Southern Indiana in the 1970s, while she was a member of the Forest Park High School band, and said there will be a similar air of excitement today.

"The interstate brand is so important for attracting the kind of high-tech, high-wage jobs that we want," said Ellspermann, a member of the Indiana House of Representatives since 2010.

Winnecke said Evansville is among several cities taking part in a consortium "to really talk about how each community along the corridor can take the most advantage possible of it. We look forward to being part of building that strategic plan."

The late Gov. Frank O'Bannon announced in January 2003 that the route chosen for I-69 would be the most direct one, taking it through mostly undeveloped farmland through Southwestern Indiana.

There was opposition, much of which was centered on the project's environmental impact and cost. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.