Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

NASCAR to Revamp Appeals Process ; Rule Book Faces Changes

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

NASCAR to Revamp Appeals Process ; Rule Book Faces Changes

Article excerpt

COLUMBIA, S. C. - NASCAR plans to automate its rule book and revamp its appeals process in a wide-ranging effort to bring more clarity to race teams and fans. The governing body outlined several initiatives Monday it expects to implement in its three major series before the 2015 racing season. The effort started eight months ago and will be an ongoing process to keep up with technology and fan interests, said Steve O'Donnell, NASCAR senior vice president of racing operations

"I think it's a change in how we do business moving forward," O'Donnell said.

That includes converting its rule book from a word document to computer automated-design drawings that can be accessed easily by race shops to see what's allowed and what isn't.

Penalties will be specifically spelled out for each type of infraction. When a rule is broken and a team appeals, NASCAR wants more experts on the panel instead of some who might not have as strong a background regarding the infraction.

"I think we put some people in somewhat tough positions" at hearing appeals, O'Donnell acknowledged. "We owe it to the industry to have experts sit in on that and make proper rulings."

O'Donnell also discussed innovations geared to the racing fans. He said NASCAR wanted to keep in sync with what people drive on the streets so their experience can match somewhat with their favorite Sprint Cup driver on the track.

The Sprint Cup and the truck series are off this week with the Nationwide Series in action at the STP 300 in Joliet, Ill.

Another area was shifting more inspection responsibility to NASCAR's Research & Development operation away from the track, freeing up more time for race teams to practice instead of waiting to have their cars looked at. NASCAR inspectors, who are assigned to individual series, in the future would be trained to handle all events, either in Sprint Cup, Nationwide or Camping World trucks.

LOCKED-IN TIMES FOR INSPECTIONS

There also might be locked-in times for on-track inspections, meaning fans would know when their favorite cars are getting put under the microscope and be on hand to watch. …

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