Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Wabash a Hoosier Treasure under Threat from Asian Carp ; COMMUNITY COMMENT

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Wabash a Hoosier Treasure under Threat from Asian Carp ; COMMUNITY COMMENT

Article excerpt

Boating down the Wabash River near Lafayette on July 16, I witnessed firsthand the broad, winding river's scenic beauty, but also got a lesson in the environmental challenges the river faces when two Asian carp hurled themselves out of the water and landed in our boat. The Wabash is Indiana's iconic river and inspiration for our state song, yet in recent years two species of invasive Asian carp have infested portions of it.

These voracious nonnative fish consume nutrients in the water, disrupting the food chain and threatening the native fish enjoyed by Hoosier anglers and sportsmen. At the sound of outboard motors, groups of Asian carp will jump out of the water and can injure boaters. The invasion of Asian carp into U.S. waterways and the risk they pose to the Great Lakes sportfishing industry has provoked consternation and litigation among our neighboring states; and as Indiana's attorney general, I want to make sure the Wabash will be protected from further spread of this aquatic nuisance.

Fortunately we have allies in this effort. First is John Goss, director of the federal government's Asian carp control efforts. John is a native Hoosier and former director of the Department of Natural Resources, and he accompanied me in a friend's Zodiac inflatable boat during part of our river tour and inspection down the Wabash.

John Goss educated me and people we met in river communities along the way about new approaches being explored to curb the carp population.

In communities along the Wabash, local residents have banded together to preserve the river. In the city of Wabash, Ind., where we launched our boat, we met with Mayor Robert Vanlandingham and some of the Wabash River Defenders, a group of volunteers who sponsor cleanup programs on the banks of the river and advocate for increased use and appreciation of the waterway.

Downriver in Peru, Ind., we met with Mayor Jim Walker and members of the Wabash River Heritage Corridor Commission, who support programs that celebrate the natural resource of the river.

In Lafayette, we met with Purdue University Professor Reuben Goforth, a renowned expert on invasive species, and we learned about innovative ideas for addressing Asian carp overpopulation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.