Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Police Video of Bicyclist Misses Key Events ; Officers Were Testing Technology at the Time

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Police Video of Bicyclist Misses Key Events ; Officers Were Testing Technology at the Time

Article excerpt

The Evansville Police Department released video Wednesday from the stop of an Evansville firefighter, which sparked a complaint against one of the officers conducting that stop. The video chronicles much of the interaction between firefighter George Madison Jr. and two police officers. But it does not show the first part of the incident, which is when Madison said one of the officers forced him to the ground and threatened to use a Taser on him.

Department spokesman Sgt. Jason Cullum said the 10-minute video came from a camera worn by Officer Jason Clegg. Clegg is one of two officers who stopped Madison after he, while on a bicycle, failed to stop at a stop sign and made some sort of hand gesture at the officers, who were in a squad car.

Some squad cars have video cameras mounted on the dashboard, but this one did not.

Clegg is the officer Madison lodged a formal complaint against, calling him angry and aggressive during their encounter. Madison also accused Clegg of intimidation and being unprofessional.

The police department said Monday that it would not pursue any disciplinary action against Clegg for the incident and classified Madison's complaint as "non-sustained."

Cullum attributed the fact that no footage exists of the disputed part of the incident to the fact that Clegg only had the camera for a few days, not that he was trying to hide something. Cullum said it would be impossible for Clegg to hide anything from the video that was already recorded because only a supervisor can download or delete any footage. Cullum added that footage from the camera - which he described as being about the size of a pager and can be worn on a shirt - cannot even be viewed by the officer in a squad car.

"I'm sure he wishes that the whole video was there like everybody else does," Cullum said. "This could have been cleared up from our standpoint as an administration."

He added that the goal of any camera program going forward is to not clear officers but document what really went on. Cullum said the department released the video on Wednesday because a local media outlet filed an open records request for the footage, not because the department wanted to make its officers look good - or Madison look bad. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.