Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Current Health Care Reform Act Probably the Last Version to Help This Generation

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Current Health Care Reform Act Probably the Last Version to Help This Generation

Article excerpt

I'll admit up front that I don't know much about the details of Obamacare. I haven't read the legislation. And because the E. W. Scripps Co., which owns The Evansville Courier & Press, as well as the organization for which my wife works, continues to provide opportunity for employees to participate in group health insurance plans, its provisions don't affect me, or us, right now.

But I'm worried it's going to go down the tubes. I'm worried that if we lose this opportunity to provide some sort of affordable health care insurance for the masses, it'll be a long time before we try again.

I'm worried because I am 62 years old, and I don't want to keep working forever. I'd like to quit before too much longer and, maybe, have a few good years to enjoy life, not to mention give my job to some younger person who is having trouble finding steady work. But I can't afford to do that.

I and a lot of my similarly aged friends are basically working for health insurance.

If we quit work, we can't afford to pay for health insurance - and we can't afford to be without it.

The coverage available to Courier & Press employees through the company isn't great. It's basically something that not too long ago would have been regarded as a catastrophic policy. The first $3,000 or so in charges during a year are mine to pay out of pocket.

That means I don't go to the doctor unless I really need to, and that's part of the strategy of such coverage.

Even so, the last time I checked with our human resources department, it would cost a little more than $800 a month for me to continue this coverage through the company in retirement.

I can't afford that. It's more than the modest pension I will draw from the company after more than 20 years of service. It would consume 40 percent of my post-retirement income from pension and Social Security, leaving little after paying for utilities, food, clothing, gasoline, home maintenance and other insurances for the "good life. …

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