Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Much of Lincoln's Life Shaped in Indiana

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Much of Lincoln's Life Shaped in Indiana

Article excerpt

Editor's note: This is one in a series of essays leading up to the celebration of the Indiana Bicentennial in December 2016. The essays will focus on the top 100 events, ideas and historical figures of Indiana, beginning with the impact of the Ice Age and ending with the legacy of the Bicentennial itself. Three states claim Abraham Lincoln as a favorite son, but only Indiana can take credit for his formative years. As he moved through adolescence to adulthood, Lincoln worked, studied and dealt with adversity on the Indiana frontier.

During this period, Lincoln handled an ax "almost constantly," as he himself recalled. He read voraciously. He practiced carpentry, even helping his father build a coffin for his mother. He took a ferry to New Orleans on business and witnessed a slave auction that troubled his soul. He listened and learned from political debates at the local general store.

"Many of the character traits and moral values that made Abraham one of the world's most respected leaders were formed and nurtured here," according to National Park Service historians at the Lincoln Boyhood Home Memorial.

The site is Indiana's most significant tribute to the 16th president, preserving some of the original acreage where Lincoln lived from age 7 to 21. A working pioneer homestead re-creates what life might have been like for the Lincolns with log cabin, outbuildings, split rail fences, livestock, gardens and crops. Memorial Court features five sculpted panels marking significant phases in Lincoln's life, including his Indiana years.

Those began in late 1816, just as Indiana became a state, when Thomas and Nancy Lincoln moved with their son and daughter from Kentucky to Spencer County, which was still a forested wilderness. The Lincolns built the first of several cabins on a knoll in the midst of a 160-acre claim near Little Pigeon Creek, and Abe and his father set about clearing land to ready it for planting. "It was a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods," Lincoln wrote. …

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