Newspaper article International Herald Tribune

'Supercapitalist' Places Wall Street Villainy in a New City ; Independent Film Tells a Familiar Finance Story, but with Culture Clashes

Newspaper article International Herald Tribune

'Supercapitalist' Places Wall Street Villainy in a New City ; Independent Film Tells a Familiar Finance Story, but with Culture Clashes

Article excerpt

The independent film touches themes familiar to Wall Streeters: poison pills, short selling, bets on the Fed's monetary policies and, of course, wealth. And Asia is on center stage.

Once in a while, a finance-oriented film comes along to pique the interest of those who follow the world of business.

The new independent movie "Supercapitalist" incorporates modern- day tools (smartphones, computer data dumps) into the familiar story of Wall Street greed. It also touches on many of the business themes familiar to Wall Streeters: poison pills, short-selling, bets on the Fed's monetary policies and, of course, wealth.

And Asia is on center stage.

Though it may seem that financiers would shun anything that would cast them in a harsh light, the film's executive producers include Sam Kwok, who is a director at a venture capital firm focused on early-stage media and technology investment, and John C. Hsu, who manages his family's investment portfolio of stocks, hedge funds, properties, private equity and venture capital.

The director, Simon Yin, also nods to the globalization of money that has shifted financial centers to other parts of the world. Although New York plays a major role, it is now Hong Kong that is the main backdrop.

Derek Ting -- who is also producer and writer -- plays Conner Lee, a smart, up-and-coming hedge fund trader in New York at a firm not-so-subtly named Supercapitalist Inc. Linus Roache assumes the role of the hedge fund's boss -- a clean-cut Wall Streeter named Mark Patterson -- while channeling a modern-day Gordon Gekko from the Oliver Stone film "Wall Street."

In the opening scene of "Supercapitalist," Mark, while speaking to clients, refers to the insider trading that is at the heart of "Wall Street."

"Back in the '80s and '90s, information was key," he says with a gravelly voice. "Now it's a whole new game. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.