Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

We Have Witnessed Racism on the Pitch Say Most Footie Fans ; M.E.N Online Survey Reveals Shock Result Most Say Not Enough Is Done to Tackle Problem

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

We Have Witnessed Racism on the Pitch Say Most Footie Fans ; M.E.N Online Survey Reveals Shock Result Most Say Not Enough Is Done to Tackle Problem

Article excerpt

MORE than three quarters of M.E.N. readers who took part in an online survey have experienced racism in professional football.

The vast majority also believe that not enough is being done to tackle the problem - and that United defender Rio Ferdinand was right not to wear a Kick It Out t-shirt before Manchester United's game against Stoke City.

Racism in football has hit the headlines recently after a number of high-profile incidents. Liverpool striker Luis Suarez was banned for eight matches after he was found guilty of abusing Reds full back Patrice Evra. And Chelsea skipper John Terry retired from international football after he was suspended for four matches for racially abusing Ferdinand's brother, Anton - a punishment which prompted Rio not to wear the tshirt.

We asked our readers a series of questions on the topic. More than 300 replied in the space of a few hours.

The survey's findings appear to suggest that racism is more a problem on the professional stage than on the parks and fields of Greater Manchester.

A total of 75.2 per cent said they had experienced racism in football with 72.5 per cent revealing they had witnessed it at a professional match.

That figure fell to 31 per cent when it came to Saturday or Sunday League matches. On the topic of school and children's football it fell even further - to 13.4 per cent.

Thirty-one people - 10.1 per cent of those surveyed - said they had been the victim of racism while playing.

The type of abuse most had witnessed were racist comments (67.6 per cent) while 44.1 per cent had heard racist chants. Some 7.8 per cent had witnessed race-related physical abuse.

However, despite those findings, most do believe that the problem of racism, the scourge of football throughout the 70s and 80s, is decreasing.

A total of 57.8 per cent believe incidents are becoming rarer while 29. …

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