Newspaper article The Tuscaloosa News

Lung Cancer Seen More in Southern Women

Newspaper article The Tuscaloosa News

Lung Cancer Seen More in Southern Women

Article excerpt

The news hit Amy Waggoner hard.

Her best friend and law partner Elyse Aussenberg, a 52-year-old mother, was diagnosed with lung cancer. No known treatment could save her. And no one, to their knowledge, was any closer to finding one.

"My heart just stopped," she said. "It felt like I'd been punched in the stomach." According to a study released recently by the Journal of Clinical Oncology, lung cancer deaths are declining in the United States with one exception: They are increasing among middle-aged Southern women.

In Georgia, the lung cancer death rate for white women born around 1960 is 20 percent higher than for those born in the 1930s, said Ahmedin Jemal, vice president for Surveillance Research at the American Cancer Society and lead author of the study.

Regina Vidaver, executive director of the National Lung Cancer Partnership, wasn't surprised by the findings. She said lung cancer incidents primarily reflect smoking patterns in those states. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.