Newspaper article The Tuscaloosa News

Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy Makes Changes to Its Automotive Program

Newspaper article The Tuscaloosa News

Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy Makes Changes to Its Automotive Program

Article excerpt

The curriculum for the automotive technology program at the Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy has been changed after being officially declared outdated.

In May, the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation inspected the school for certification. During its inspection, the foundation reported that the automotive technology program's curriculum wasn't up to date and needed to be replaced, said Kathleen Hughston, the Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy's principal.

"We are certified," Hughston said. "The only thing is, after certification, they notified us that they were updating the curriculum, and therefore, our curriculum is no longer current. It's an industry update for that curriculum."

Hughston said that the automotive industry is constantly changing to keep up with its customers' technology needs. Because of that, automotive technology curriculum can quickly become outdated.

But that's a problem that shouldn't happen at the Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy again, Hughston said.

On Tuesday, the school board approved a proposal by Hughston and technology instructor Ronnie Phillips to adopt a new curriculum at the school that will consistently remain up-to-date.

The curriculum is being purchased for $59,000 from ARGO, an international provider of curriculums that are cloud-based, meaning the information is stored on the Internet.

The new curriculum meets all National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation automotive technology certification standards and will be updated with any changes the automotive industry makes at no additional cost to the school system, Hughston said.

In addition to the new curriculum, the $59,000 is paying for new tools and toolboxes with lifetime warranties.

Hughston said the biggest difference between the new curriculum and the old is that students get to take apart, repair and put together vehicles virtually on a computer before they do it in real life.

"If there was a motor on the screen, they could actually take a stylus and remove a part of that motor with the stylus," she said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.