Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Caffeine You Can Inhale Aeroshot Gives Buzz in the Mouth as Substitute for Coffee, Red Bull

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Caffeine You Can Inhale Aeroshot Gives Buzz in the Mouth as Substitute for Coffee, Red Bull

Article excerpt

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Move over, coffee and Red Bull. A Harvard professor thinks the next big thing will be people inhaling their caffeine from a lipstick-sized tube. Critics say the novel product is not without its risks.

The product, called AeroShot, went on the market late last month in Massachusetts and New York, and is also available in France. A single unit costs $2.99.

Biomedical engineering professor David Edwards said AeroShot is safe and does not contain common additives, like taurine, used to amplify the caffeine effect in common energy drinks. Each gray-and- yellow plastic canister contains 100 milligrams of caffeine powder, about the amount in a large cup of coffee, plus B vitamins.

But Democratic U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York wants the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to review AeroShot, saying he fears it will be used as a club drug so that young people can drink until they drop. Mr. Schumer's national press secretary could not be reached for comment.

FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey declined to comment, saying the agency will respond directly to Mr. Schumer on the matter.

Mr. Edwards said Mr. Schumer's comments are understandable in the context of developments over the last few years, when students looking for a quick and cheap buzz began consuming caffeine-packed alcoholic drinks they dubbed "blackout in a can" because of their potency. But he said AeroShot is not targeting anyone under 18 and it safely delivers caffeine into the mouth, just like coffee.

"Even with coffee -- if you look at the reaction in Europe to coffee when it first appeared -- there was quite a bit of hysteria," he said. "So anything new, there's always some knee-jerk reaction that makes us believe 'Well, maybe it's not safe.' "

Once a user shoots a puff of calorie-free AeroShot into his or her mouth, the lemon-lime powder begins dissolving almost instantly. Each single-use container has up to six puffs.

"The act of putting it in your mouth is the act of breathing -- so it's sort of surprising and often people the first time they take the AeroShot, they laugh," said Mr. …

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