Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Pacino to Play Paterno in Film

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Pacino to Play Paterno in Film

Article excerpt

LOS ANGELES -- Al Pacino will play Joe Paterno in a movie about the late Penn State football coach.

Producer Edward R. Pressman confirms Brian De Palma will direct "Happy Valley," the tentative title of the film, based on Joe Posnanski's best-seller "Paterno."

" 'Happy Valley' reunites the 'Scarface' and 'Carlito's Way' team of De Palma and Pacino for the third time, and I can't think of a better duo to tell this story of a complex, intensely righteous man who was brought down by his own tragic flaw," Pressman said in a statement.

No start or release dates were given for the film.

While Pressman said the plot remains "under wraps," Posnanski's book followed Paterno's final years, as the winningest coach in college football history saw his career end in disgrace in 2011 with the sex abuse scandal involving assistant Jerry Sandusky.

ARMSTRONG REMARKS GET MIXED REACTION

AIGLE, Switzerland -- The International Cycling Union says Lance Armstrong's confession of doping is "an important step" toward repairing the damage he did to cycling.

UCI President Pat McQuaid says Armstrong confronting his past, in an interview with talk-show host Oprah Winfrey, moves cycling "forward on the long road" to restoring confidence in the sport.

McQuaid said the UCI would welcome Armstrong participating in a proposed "truth and reconciliation process" for cycling.

In London today, the vice president of the International Olympic Committee said the confession was "too little, too late" and failed to provide any new information that will help clean up the sport he tarnished through years of cheating.

A day after stripping Armstrong of his bronze medal from the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the IOC urged the disgraced former Tour de France champion to supply details to anti-doping authorities in order to "bring an end to this dark episode."

IOC vice president Thomas Bach said Armstrong's admission to Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs -- after years of vehement denials -- was not enough.

"If he thinks this interview would help him get credibility back, I think this is too little, too late," said Bach, a German lawyer who leads the IOC's anti-doping investigations. …

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