Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

New Rule Makes It Easier to Interpret Translators Allowed on Trips to Mound

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

New Rule Makes It Easier to Interpret Translators Allowed on Trips to Mound

Article excerpt

TAMPA, Fla. --

There were times in the minor leagues when Mariano Rivera felt totally lost on the mound. That was, before he got a good grasp of his cut fastball -- and English.

"The manager or coach would tell me something and I didn't understand them," Rivera, a New York Yankees closer, said. "You nod your head yes, but you have no idea what they are saying."

Major League Baseball is trying to ease the language barrier, adopting a new rule that permits interpreters to join mound conferences when pitchers aren't fluent in English.

Yet for Latino pitchers, something still might get lost in translation.

As it stands, only people employed full time as interpreters can accompany managers and pitching coaches onto the field. And right now most, if not all, are for Asian players. Yu Darvish and Hiroki Kuroda, for example, are routinely provided translators by their teams. But Spanish-speaking players mostly rely on bilingual teammates or coaches to help them, be it on the mound, in the field or in the clubhouse.

The reasoning is that Asian players go directly from overseas teams to the majors without time to pick up English in the minors. Also, most linguists consider the transition to be more difficult than it is for Latino players.

"It's kind of the same and it's kind of different," Baltimore catcher Matt Wieters said. "For the most part, a lot of the Latin guys that are in the big leagues have been through the minor leagues, have had years of experience in the minor leagues to develop a relationship. Some of the Asian pitchers come over here and it's their first year over here and they haven't had that sort of adjustment time. It's up for debate."

Baltimore pitcher Wei-Yin Chen said through Orioles translator Tim Lin that, above all, the rule should be fair.

"If I can bring my interpreter, Spanish players should bring their interpreter, too," he said. …

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