Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Blocking Strategies Differ on Track

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Blocking Strategies Differ on Track

Article excerpt

Tony Stewart says never. Joey Logano says late in the race. Jimmie Johnson says to protect a victory in the final laps, except, perhaps, if Stewart is behind him because of the potential consequences.

Theories on blocking and when it is acceptable vary widely in the NASCAR garage.

The topic has become a hot one since the previous race two weeks ago in California, where an infuriated Stewart confronted Logano's crew and accused the young driver of blocking him late in the race.

"I don't like blocking. I never have, I never will," Stewart said at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. "It's our jobs as drivers to go out there and try to pass people. That is what racing is about. We didn't have blocking 10 years ago. I don't know where all of a sudden it became a common deal or some people think it's alright to do now and think it's common practice. I don't believe it should be common practice."

Others disagree, especially when trying to hang on for a victory.

"Those are decisions we all make on the track and when you are in the sport long enough, you realize what those decisions could lead to and, honestly, who you throw a block on," Johnson said.

"They could come back and haunt you, so as we are trying to win a race, win for our team, win for our sponsors, there are these other elements that you may not consciously think of, but there is this quick snapshot that flashes through your mind when you throw a block," he continued, adding that if you see Stewart approaching in your rear view mirror, "you probably expect something is going to happen."

Blocking can be keeping a car in front of you by continually positioning your car in front of theirs, or taking away their preferred line around the track by adopting it for yourself, even if it's not your preferred line. The thinking is if a driver is gaining on you, taking away his line can slow that.

At Martinsville, where the Sprint Cup Series will race 500 laps today, cars typically swing wide heading into the turns at each end of the track, then hug the inside curb. …

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