Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

SUSAN R. WINICOUR MAY 14, 1939 - JULY 17, 2013 GIFTED ARTIST, TEACHER WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH [Corrected 07/23/13]

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

SUSAN R. WINICOUR MAY 14, 1939 - JULY 17, 2013 GIFTED ARTIST, TEACHER WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH [Corrected 07/23/13]

Article excerpt

"Rather than put her thoughts into words, her figures express her thoughts," said artist Adrienne Heinrich of her longtime friend and fellow artist, Susan Winicour, and added, "She didn't promenade her work about. It was all very personal. She was a true artist."

Ms. Winicour, whose work can be found in private collections as well as gallery shows in Pittsburgh and abroad, died on Wednesday of cancer. She was 74.

"She was always drawing people. On the train, in restaurants ... She'd try to do it without them knowing, but you could see them peeking," said Robin Simon, Ms. Winicour's daughter.

Ms. Winicour was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y. She attended the Arts Students League and received scholarships to attend Syracuse University, where she studied fine arts. It was during her time at Syracuse that she also met her future husband, Jeffrey Winicour, at a Halloween party. She subsequently obtained a master's degree from the Teacher's College of Columbia University, and was among the first teachers of fine arts to be hired by the New York City Public School system.

Ms. Winicour moved to Pittsburgh when her husband, a physicist, received a position at the University of Pittsburgh. Ms. Winicour spent her time raising her two children, running avidly and working on her art.

"It really was everything to her. She really needed art in her life, and she worked hard at it," said Ellen Neuberg, owner of Gallery Chiz in Shadyside, where Ms. Winicour's work has been shown. Along with others, Ms. Winicour helped begin Eastside Gallery, a co- op gallery. The two women also were part of the Pittsburgh Group, in which artists come together to talk about and critique each other's work.

Primarily a figurative painter, Ms. Winicour felt that her greatest influence came from German Expressionism, a 20th century movement recognizable for its subjective perspective and emotional tone.

In one artist's statement, Ms. Winicour wrote, "I try to achieve a strong psychological or mental bond between subjects which are either still or in motion. Individually each figure has its own private place and contemplates its own destiny. …

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