Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Too Much Noise Undermines the National Ability to Hear

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Too Much Noise Undermines the National Ability to Hear

Article excerpt

Listen up, if you can still hear me.

A recent New York Times article, "Ground-Shaking Noise Rocks N.F.L., and Eardrums Take Big Hit," documents something that we already know about professional football games: they are extremely loud.

The crowds themselves are huge, of course, but the elevated noise levels aren't entirely the natural result of the fans' aroused enthusiasm for their teams. In fact, crowds are encouraged to yell ever louder by the league, by the franchises, and by groups of fans organized around the principle that loud is better.

For example, Terrorhead Returns, a club that supports the Kansas City Chiefs, sponsored a "scream-a-thon" recently during a game against the Oakland Raiders and pumped the crowd up to a din that reached 137.5 decibels, a Guinness world record for the loudest crowd roar in an outdoor stadium.

The Seattle Seahawks' version of Terrorhead Returns is a group called The 12th Man, which asserts that Seattle's fans are the loudest in the NFL. The club portrays its claim to the previous record decibel mark by plotting it along a scale that rates ordinary conversation at 50 decibels. The 12th Man's previous record reached 136.6 decibels, registering between "Jet Takeoff" and "Aircraft Carrier Flight Deck," which is just below "Eardrum Rupture," at 150 decibels.

But these levels on the scale are already well above "Hearing Damage" at 90 decibels and "Serious Hearing Damage" at 100. Hearing experts say the damage actually starts at 85.

Why do the fans want to make so much noise? The 12th Man aspires to an active role in the game itself, implying on its website that the "ear-shattering noise" interferes with opponents' signal calling and contributes to an average of 2.36 false starts per game.

But apart from audiologists and a few parents and curmudgeons, nobody seems very concerned about the extreme noise in NFL stadiums. An appeal to old-fashioned sportsmanship probably won't achieve much traction among modern football fans. …

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