Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Pakistan's Machismo Politics, the Rise of the Islamic State, How to Stop Terrorism, Importance of Democracy, South Africa's Unequal Society

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Pakistan's Machismo Politics, the Rise of the Islamic State, How to Stop Terrorism, Importance of Democracy, South Africa's Unequal Society

Article excerpt

Dawn / Karachi, Pakistan Pakistan needs to shed its machismo politics"Pakistan's foreign policy doesn't work because our national psyche is based on pure machismo...," writes Bina Shah. This pride "characterises us as a nation, with heavy dependency on an almost all-male army, a male-dominated political scene, sophisticated weaponry, and a large national ego that overreacts to the slightest threat.... True feminism goes deeper than gender equality, and addresses issues of power structure, equal participation in nation- building, distribution of resources, and human rights. These are issues we must address in our national narrative, our social order, and our identity-formation as Pakistanis to progress.... If we can make the national discourse truly pluralistic, by being inclusive of all members of society - the goal of feminism - we will ... change for the better the dynamic of our current, limited existence."

Al Jazeera / Doha, QatarThe US contributed to the rise of Islamic State"ISIL, Arab, Islam, violence, cruelty, and disorder on the one side; the United States, the West, Christianity, power, benevolence, order, on the other side. That's the inescapable impression one gets when watching the media coverage of the Middle East, or when listening to conservative pundits in the US," writes Marwan Bishara. "For all practical purpose, western focus on ISIL's barbarity, bigotry and bombast has helped justify the wholesale crimes of a tyrant like [Syrian President Bashar al-Assad], and obfuscated the role of the [George W.] Bush administration in the breakup of Iraq and the killings of hundreds of thousands, all of which ultimately led to the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)."

The Globe and Mail / TorontoSmarter ways to meet the threat of terrorism"Terrorism is a weapon of the weak. It aims to maim and to kill, but above all it seeks to provoke a more powerful opponent...," states an editorial. "Terrorism is designed to provoke an overreaction, which in turn causes collateral damage, leading to polarization, more reaction and overreaction, and more violence. Only in a polarized world do the radicals stand a chance of winning attention, sympathy and recruits. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.