Newspaper article International New York Times

A Factory Rebuilt for Comfortable Living in London ; 4-Bedroom Brick Home in Notting Hill District Was Once a Foundry

Newspaper article International New York Times

A Factory Rebuilt for Comfortable Living in London ; 4-Bedroom Brick Home in Notting Hill District Was Once a Foundry

Article excerpt

The former ironworks has been turned into a light and expansive home in the well-to-do neighborhood.

Clarendon Cross is a small area on the western slopes of Notting Hill Gate, across the road from the grand stucco mansions of Holland Park. It has a bespoke furniture shop, a clothing boutique, a pet groomers and a restaurant that draws locals to its outdoor tables.

Amid this genteel neighborhood is a red brick building that looks a lot like the small factory it once was. Clarendon Works -- the name is still on the gable -- was a foundry.

The renovated property is on the market for 10.5 million pounds, or $17.9 million. In the W11 postal code area that includes Clarendon Cross, that price is considerably higher than the average, although the property is bigger than most. And with its distinctive appearance, the home stands out from the terraced houses that characterize the district. According to the property website Home.co.uk, the average selling price of a terraced home in London in February was Pounds 3,030,083, or 21 percent more than a year earlier.

The buyer of Clarendon Works will get five floors of living space with four bedrooms, three bathrooms, an indoor garage, a gym and a home-theater room.

Plus a share in quirky local history.

Christopher Bodker, the owner, said that the foundry once made door handles and other fittings for the 1850s-era developers who built homes in Notting Hill Gate and Holland Park. "There are still manhole covers with Clarendon Works engraved on them on roads in the area," he said.

Mr. Bodker, who manages a residential property fund for an asset management company, noted that the neighborhood has a particular appeal. "You have to admire the scale of the ambition of the developers," he said. "Typical Victorians. They did the work on spec and in their own way, which explains why there are so many different styles of architecture in the area -- from the grand to the humble terrace.

"They built some of London's most famous street names, such as Lansdowne Crescent, Pembridge Road and Chepstow Crescent. They believed everything was possible."

The owner of a string of restaurants before switching to his current career, Mr. …

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