Newspaper article International New York Times

Hong Kong Police Take Down Remaining Protest Site

Newspaper article International New York Times

Hong Kong Police Take Down Remaining Protest Site

Article excerpt

As the last camp was dismantled, the prominent student activist, Joshua Wong, appeared in court with about 30 other arrested protesters.

CORRECTION APPENDED

Pro-democracy protests that swept onto the streets of Hong Kong 11 weeks ago came to a muted ending on Monday, when the police swiftly dismantled the last remaining road occupation, and a prominent student activist, Joshua Wong, appeared in court with about 30 other arrested protesters.

But the city still faced aftershocks from the months of political strife.

After almost three months of tumult, the street protests had dwindled to a few dozen tents in a hectic shopping district of Causeway Bay. Before the police moved in to clear the area, most of the remaining dozens of protesters packed away their tents and sleeping bags and left the road of shops and malls festooned with Christmas decorations. At least 10 protesters were arrested for refusing to leave.

The protesters support what they call the Umbrella Movement, after umbrellas were used to fend off the police's use of pepper spray.

"It's my responsibility," said Harry Chow, a 47-year-old floor polisher who said he had quit his job to join the protests and would accept arrest. "I want to tell people that the Umbrella Movement is not ending, and this is just a small part of it."

Within 30 minutes of the police moving in, the last tent was pulled down and the road was nearly cleared of debris. By midday, the street was open to traffic again, marking the end of blockades that have affected several main commercial districts.

The camp at Causeway Bay was by far the smallest, and the least volatile, of the street occupations that sprang up across the city on Sept. 28. On that day, the police's use of tear gas and pepper spray to disperse student protesters around the city government headquarters backfired, and tens of thousands of people took to the streets in anger, also demanding that the government heed their calls for democratic voting rights.

Leung Chun-ying, the city's leader, said that Hong Kong citizens' pursuit of democracy and election methods should adhere to the laws.

"What should be the democracy that Hong Kong people pursue? I think Hong Kong, like all developed democracies, should pursue and practice a democracy based on the rule of law, meaning we only carry out democratic activities, exercise our democratic rights, in accordance to the laws," he told reporters after attending an event.

The Hong Kong police commissioner, Andy Tsang, said that the monthslong protests have resulted in 955 arrests. A total of 75 people have given themselves in to the police for their participation in the protests. Those cases will be investigated within three months, he said.

Another small encampment, at the back of the city's Legislative Council, was dismantled by the legislature's staff after protesters left and moved their tents to the pavement on an adjacent road. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.