Newspaper article International New York Times

Muslims, Marriage and Bigotry

Newspaper article International New York Times

Muslims, Marriage and Bigotry

Article excerpt

Let's combat the intolerance that can infect people of any faith, or of no faith.

In North Carolina, three young Muslims who were active in charity work were murdered, allegedly by a man who identified as atheist and expressed hostility to Islam and other faiths. Police are exploring whether it was a hate crime, and it spurred a #MuslimLivesMatter campaign on Twitter.

And, in Alabama, we see judges refusing to approve marriages of any kind because then they would also have to approve same-sex marriages. In one poll conducted last year, some 59 percent of people in Alabama opposed gay marriage. Somehow a loving God is cited to bar loving couples from committing to each other.

These are very different news stories. But I wonder if a common lesson from both may be the importance of resisting bigotry, of combating the intolerance that can infect people of any faith -- or of no faith.

I don't think Muslims should feel obliged to apologize for the Charlie Hebdo terror attacks. Nor do I think atheists need apologize for the killing of the three Muslims. But it does seem useful for everyone to reflect on our capacity to "otherize" people of a different faith, race, nationality or sexuality -- and to turn that other-ness into a threat. That's what the Islamic State does to us. And sometimes that's what we do, too.

O.K. I'm sure some of you are protesting: That's a false equivalency. True, there is a huge difference between burning someone alive and not granting a couple a marriage license. But, then again, it's not much of a slogan to say, "We're better than ISIS!"

There has been a pugnacious defensiveness among conservative Christians to any parallels between Christian overreach and Islamic overreach, as seen in the outraged reaction to President Obama's acknowledgment at the National Prayer Breakfast this month that the West has plenty to regret as well. But Obama was exactly right: How can we ask Islamic leaders to confront extremism in their faith if we don't acknowledge Christian extremism, from the Crusades to Srebrenica?

More broadly, one message of the New Testament is the value of focusing on one's own mistakes rather than those of others. "You hypocrite," Jesus says in Matthew 7:5. "First take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye."

We could do with a little more of that spirit these days, at a time when everybody wants to practice ophthalmology on everyone else. …

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