Newspaper article International New York Times

Democracy Is in Recession

Newspaper article International New York Times

Democracy Is in Recession

Article excerpt

Turkey's drift away from democracy is part of a much larger global trend.

Every month now we get treated to another anti-Semitic blast from Turkey's leadership, which seems to be running some kind of slur-of- the-month club. Who knew that Jews all over the world were busy trying to take down President Recep Tayyip Erdogan? Last week, it was Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu's turn to declare that Turkey would not "succumb to the Jewish lobby" -- among others supposedly trying to topple Erdogan, the Hurriyet Daily News reported. This was after Erdogan had suggested that domestic opponents to the ruling Justice and Development Party, or A.K.P., were "cooperating with the Mossad," Israel's intelligence arm. So few Jews, so many governments to topple.

Davutoglu's and Erdogan's cheap, crude anti-Semitic tropes, which Erdogan now relies on regularly to energize his base, are disgusting. For the great nation of Turkey, though, they're part of a wider tragedy. It is really hard to say anymore that Erdogan's Turkey is a democracy. Even worse, it is necessary to say that Turkey's drift away from democracy is part of a much larger global trend today: Democracy is in recession.

As the Stanford University democracy expert Larry Diamond argues in an essay entitled "Facing Up to the Democratic Recession" in the latest issue of the Journal of Democracy: "Around 2006, the expansion of freedom and democracy in the world came to a prolonged halt. Since 2006, there has been no net expansion in the number of electoral democracies, which has oscillated between 114 and 119 (about 60 percent of the world's states). ... The number of both electoral and liberal democracies began to decline after 2006 and then flattened out. Since 2006 the average level of freedom in the world has also deteriorated slightly."

Since 2000, added Diamond, "I count 25 breakdowns of democracy in the world -- not only through blatant military or executive coups, but also through subtle and incremental degradations of democratic rights and procedure. ... Some of these breakdowns occurred in quite low-quality democracies; yet in each case, a system of reasonably free and fair multiparty electoral competition was either displaced or degraded to a point well below the minimal standards of democracy."

Vladimir Putin's Russia and Erdogan's Turkey are the poster children for this trend, along with Venezuela, Thailand, Botswana, Bangladesh and Kenya. In Turkey, Diamond writes, the A.K.P. has steadily extended "partisan control over the judiciary and the bureaucracy, arresting journalists and intimidating dissenters in the press and academia, threatening businesses with retaliation if they fund opposition parties, and using arrests and prosecutions in cases connected to alleged coup plots to jail and remove from public life an implausibly large number of accused plotters. …

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