Newspaper article International New York Times

Sympathy Flows after Rose Injures Knee Again ; Bulls Guard Will Have 3rd Major Knee Surgery in Less Than 3 Years

Newspaper article International New York Times

Sympathy Flows after Rose Injures Knee Again ; Bulls Guard Will Have 3rd Major Knee Surgery in Less Than 3 Years

Article excerpt

Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls will need his third major knee surgery in less than three years to repair a torn medial meniscus in his right knee.

The cloud of uncertainty that had engulfed Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls since 2012 was beginning to recede. Then came the news late Tuesday night that Rose -- a former N.B.A. rookie of the year and most valuable player -- would need his third major knee operation in less than three years.

The injury, the Bulls said, was a torn medial meniscus in his right knee, the same injury that cut short his 2013-14 season after only 10 games. During the 2011-12 playoffs, Rose sustained a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee and did not return for 549 days.

Reaction to the stunning news reverberated around the league. The deep sympathy from peers and league pundits reflected the unfortunate injury history of a player with immense talent.

"Man feel bad for D.Rose!" LeBron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers tweeted Tuesday night. "Keep your head up homie and stay strong G!"

Before Chicago's 98-86 loss to the Charlotte Hornets on Wednesday, Bulls Coach Tom Thibodeau told reporters: "I don't know what to say, other than it's just so unfair. The guy has been through so much."

Rose was unavailable to reporters on Wednesday, and the Bulls would not say when the surgery would take place. The recovery timeline, the club said, would be established after the procedure.

One question that lingered was whether Rose, 26, would elect to have the damaged tissue repaired or would decide to have part or all of the tissue removed. The choice could drastically change his recovery period.

Dr. Robert Marx, an orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan, said the recovery time could be as short as a few weeks if part of the meniscus tissue were removed. When the meniscus is repaired with sutures -- the procedure Rose underwent last season -- the recovery could take up to six months.

Marx, who has not examined Rose, emphasized that such timetables varied from case to case, depending on many factors.

In regard to long-term health, repairing the meniscus -- and, in general, preserving as much of the tissue as possible -- is preferable to removing some or all of it. …

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