Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

A GOP Abortion Bill Shouldn't Resemble a 'War on Women'

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

A GOP Abortion Bill Shouldn't Resemble a 'War on Women'

Article excerpt

As thousands descended on Washington, D.C., last week for the annual "March for Life," the Republican House of Representatives was busy watering down an anti-abortion bill that restricted abortions after 20 weeks, except in cases of rape or incest, with exemptions allowed only after a police report had been filed. This after a small group of moderate Republican female lawmakers challenged the bill and lobbied for a less restrictive measure.

Politics wins. Life loses.

It seems these moderate Republicans, fearing the bill could revive the Democrats' phony "War on Women" mantra, erred on the side of expedience so as not to, as the Washington Post writes, "...expose Republicans in swing districts to a barrage of attack ads in 2016 from women's rights groups and Democrats."

The symbolism behind such a bill on the 42nd anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe vs. Wade decision is understandable, but if Republicans are serious about advancing protection for the unborn in the age of Obamacare, they will adopt a different strategy. They might start by looking back 50 years to the civil rights movement.

People who are old enough to remember, or have seen the film "Selma," recall how pictures and personal stories helped move the hearts and change the minds of many Americans in support of civil rights legislation.

As Black History Month begins next week, the Republican Congress should hold a series of hearings on the impact the elimination of 55 million unborn lives has had on our culture. They can begin with testimony from black women and black men like J. Kenneth Blackwell, a former Ohio secretary of state and currently a policy board member of the American Civil Rights Union.

In a recent column for The Washington Times, Blackwell cited figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and wrote: "black women continue to have the highest abortion rate of any ethnic group, with a gruesome 483 abortions for every 1,000 births. …

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