Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

It All Starts with SUNSHINE & GRAIN ; Special featureOpen Farm Sunday Was a Chance to Teach Children Where Their Food Is from (but They Were Too Busy Having Fun to Notice They Were Learning)

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

It All Starts with SUNSHINE & GRAIN ; Special featureOpen Farm Sunday Was a Chance to Teach Children Where Their Food Is from (but They Were Too Busy Having Fun to Notice They Were Learning)

Article excerpt

-- Open Farm Sunday, farmers threw open their gates so families could celebrate British food and farming.

For some it was a fascinating first visit to a working farm. For others - especially the kids - it was a chance to wander round in wellies having fun (not realising they were learning, too).

More than 200,000 people visited farms on Open Farm Sunday. They met farmers and saw what it's like to grow food and look after the land.

Sadly many children don't realise that most of the foods they eat every day start out in the fields and pastures of our countryside.

Kellogg wanted to get involved to tell the story of the special people and places around the country that provide its ingredients.

Among the visitors when Hall Farm in Loddington, Leicestershire invited us to see how our food is produced were the Gibson family. The children, Lily, five, and Jack, four, dived into some drawing activities while mum Hayley, 34, and dad Joe, 38, sussed the lay of the land.

By a Kellogg display stand was a square metre of a wheat field showing grains which go into breakfast cereals. The children discovered how much of nature goes into a single square metre of wheat - from 1,250 hours of sunshine and 109 buckets of rain to organic matter.

It will produce about 20,000 grains of wheat, enough to make 28 bowls of cereal.

Lily, who enjoyed drawing a scarecrow like the ones on the farm, said of the wheat: "It looks like big grass but you can eat it.

"It feels lovely. "We saw all the different seeds and grains. We eat the grains in lots of things. I didn't know that."

Another visitor, Henry Porter, seven, opportunity to countryside.

said: "I know a lot of our food comes from farms but I didn't know before today what happens to it before we eat it.

natural been "I learned about wheat being turned into flour. "I liked hiding in the mini field. The machinery on display was hard to ignore. …

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