Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

I Get a Lot of Inspiration from What Dad's Doing, and Get to Share Advice ; David Sue Talks to Liam Finn, Son of Crowded House Frontman Neil, but a Talented Artist Keen to Succeed on His Own Merit

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

I Get a Lot of Inspiration from What Dad's Doing, and Get to Share Advice ; David Sue Talks to Liam Finn, Son of Crowded House Frontman Neil, but a Talented Artist Keen to Succeed on His Own Merit

Article excerpt

T wouldn't be unfair to describe singersongwriter Liam Finn as being a glass half-full kind of guy.

IBorn in Australia and raised in New Zealand, he has spent much of his adult life moving from place to place, country to country: the very definition of the musical nomad.

And even when those journeys don't always conclude with a happy ending, he has always preferred to embrace the glass half-full philosophy.

Case in point: a few years back, while trying to get his fledgling music career off the ground, he relocated from his native New Zealand to London.

"That was a big steep learning curve," Finn reminisces.

"During my time in London, I was robbed, held up at gunpoint; pretty crazy stuff. It was quite an introduction!

"But I'd like to think my time in England made a man out of me.

"It was like, 'Well, if I'm gonna succeed with my music, I'll have to face some **** along the way'. You have to take the positives."

Fast forward to the present day, and Liam Finn most certainly doesn't need to search out those elusive silver linings anymore.

The 30-year-old is the proud architect of three acclaimed solo records; he's also firmly shrugged off the shadow cast by his famous heritage (his father is Neil Finn, of veteran New Zealand band Crowded House); and, most significantly, his adopted new home, New York City, has brought a joyous full-stop to his former nomadic existence.

New York, his home for almost three years, provides the electrifying backdrop for Finn's third - and undoubtedly best - album to date, The Nihilist.

Released back in May to widespread critical applause, it's a record that, like previous efforts, sensitively tackles matters of the heart - only this time, however, the object of affection is more place than person.

"It's a bit of cliche to say it, but every time you hit the streets of New York, you feel like you're on a movie set," he enthuses. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.