Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Pirates Minor League System Playing in the Present Gift Ngoepe Has Endured Struggles on and off the Field, but He Is Focused on One Prize

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Pirates Minor League System Playing in the Present Gift Ngoepe Has Endured Struggles on and off the Field, but He Is Focused on One Prize

Article excerpt

In a rain-spattered dugout, Gift Ngoepe eats Twizzlers and talks about home. Not the home he shares with pitcher Zack Dodson when he is playing for the Pirates' Class AA affiliate, the Altoona Curve, but his home half a world away in South Africa.

He talks about the place he grew up, the roughly 10-foot wide room that served as the kitchen and bedroom.

There aren't many places where a boy can fall in love with baseball in South Africa. But growing up in a clubhouse might be the best place to start.

That is where this tiny room was: attached to the clubhouse at a ballpark in Randburg, South Africa. His mother, Maureen, worked for a team called the Mets, cleaning and doing other jobs. Ngoepe lived in the closet-sized room with Maureen and his younger brother.

Ngoepe could have played soccer or cricket -- the sports most of his countrymen prefer. But he chose baseball, a game many South Africans don't understand. He told his mother long ago that he would make it to the major leagues, and that when he did, he would provide for her, as she had for him.

He is not the most highly touted prospect. Some fans might never have heard the name Mpho Ngoepe, his first name meaning "gift" in the Sotho language, his last name pronounced en-WEE-pay. He has been in the Pirates system for five years and he has not made it past Class AA.

But yet it's Ngoepe -- not Gregory Polanco or Jameson Taillon -- who was profiled in Sports Illustrated long before he made it out of rookie ball. Not because of his bat or glove, but because he had a story to tell. A story that starts in South Africa and hasn't yet reached its ending.

* * *

Ngoepe left Africa for an MLB academy in Italy, where the Pirates spotted him. In 2008, he signed with the organization and soon came to America.

A 5-foot-10, 165-pound middle infielder, Ngoepe played for the Pirates Gulf Coast League team in Bradenton, Fla., in 2009 at 19. From there, his ascension through the Pirates system has been slow.

The transition to American baseball was not easy, but the transition to an American mentality might have been more difficult.

Being ready to field grounders and hit batting practice hours before the first pitch was an adjustment. In South Africa, Ngoepe and his teammates were on the field 20 or 30 minutes before the game. American ballplayers are working on their skills hours before game time, and, even then, they have to arrive early.

"If you're not on the field five minutes early, you're late," Ngoepe, 24, said of the American standard. "Five minutes is a lot of time. I can get ready and eat and make it out on time. The atmosphere was more relaxed in South Africa."

His bat has needed adjustments, too. Ngoepe has always been a smooth fielder, playing shortstop and second base. But his highest batting average was .297 in 2011, a year in which he played 27 games between rookie ball and Class A West Virginia. …

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