Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Taking the Lead Blairsville Man Moves Up from Board of Farm Bureau to Top Position

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Taking the Lead Blairsville Man Moves Up from Board of Farm Bureau to Top Position

Article excerpt

Richard Ebert has been a member of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau for 32 years. The 54-year old dairy farmer from Blairsville started in the Westmoreland County bureau, then became a member of the state board of directors. For the past 10 years he has served as vice president. Now he has an even bigger role to play.

At the bureau's 64th annual meeting Nov. 17-19, Mr. Ebert was elected board president for a two-year term. The bureau is a volunteer organization of farmers statewide with a membership of about 58,000.

"A lot of farmers know Rick and are comfortable with him," said Mark O'Neill, media relations director for the bureau. "He's familiar with farmers across the state, has testified for us in Washington [D.C.] and has been our bureau's main representative before the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board."

Co-owner of Will-Mar-Re Farms in along with his brother, William, Mr. Ebert works the family farm, first purchased by his grandfather, Joseph Pignocco, and his father, John, in 1942.

When he and his brother formed a partnership in 1982, they also bought their uncle Atley Barnhart's farm about 3 miles away. Looking for a name for the farm that has a combined total of more than 400 acres, they decided on Will-Mar-Re, named for William and Martha, William's then-wife, and himself.

As president of the farm bureau, Mr. Ebert's is the bureau's spokesman, discusses agricultural issues with state and federal legislators and attends monthly board meetings in Camp Hill.

"We have 54 county bureaus, which serve all of the state's 67 counties, and I want to work with them a lot closer to get more involved and strengthen the bureau," he said. "One big issue now facing the state is funding the pensions of state employees. We may be looking at a big property tax increase, which is where a lot of the funding comes from and [that] would have a big impact on farmers."

On the national level, he said there's a problem with the overreach of the Environment Protection Agency, which he sees as trying to regulate everything that deals with water from the moment it leaves the drain spout until it leaves the property. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.